RENAISSANCE LUTES

RENAISSANCE LUTES

Lutes with six to ten courses. Models after leading Italian and German makers including Hans Frei, Georg Gerle, Magno Tieffenbrucker, Vvendelio Venere and Sixtus Rauwolf.


Renaissance lutes fall into two broad groups. Those made in the early part of the century by makers such as Hans Frei and Laux Maler in Bologna. The main characteristic is a long narrow body of nine or 11 broad ribs with rather straight shoulders. This shape was known as the pear or pearl  form.Mainly with six courses of strings.

Post 1560 a different style of lute gained popularity. The best were made in Venice and Padua, by various members of  the Tieffenbrucker family, though there were many makers working in the same style. Typically these  lutes had a broad, elliptical  body built of at least thirteen ribs, and seven or more courses of strings. 

In the catalogue descriptions the term ‘original design’ is used to identify models that I have designed – based on the principles of design and construction found in historical lutes. Where a maker’s name is given (e.g Vvendelio Venere) the model is based on a surviving historical lute, or a significant part of that instrument.