Seven course Renaissance lutes

The use of seven course lutes started in the 1560s, though they are known to have existed even as early as 1511 when they were mentioned by Sebastien Virdung in Musica Getutsch. The first printed music for the instrument in Italy is Giulio Cesarre Barbetta’s Libro Primo of 1569.

Treble lute after Vvendelio Venere

Treble lute after Vvendelio Venere

  • String length 44 cm
  • 8½ frets spaces
  • Model WE

Based on the 7 course treble lute by Vvendelio Venere in the Kunsthistorischesmuseum in Vienna (C39)

View full instrument details >

Vvendelio Venere

Vvendelio Venere

  • String length 58.7 cm
  • 8 ⅔ fret spaces
  • Model WT

Modelled on the 1592 Venere alto lute now in the collection of the Academia Filarmonica di Bologna.

View full instrument details >

Original design

Original design

  • String length 63.5 cm
  • 8 ⅔ fret spaces
  • Model VV

Designed in the style of the Vvendelio Venere workshop.

View full instrument details >

Sixtus Rauwolf

Sixtus Rauwolf

  • String length 64.5 cm
  • 8 ⅔ fret spaces
  • Model R

Based on original instrument by Sixtus Rauwolf in Augsburg, now owned and played by Jakob Lindberg

View full instrument details >

Vvendelio Venere

Vvendelio Venere

  • String length 67 cm
  • 8 ⅔ spaces
  • Model WW

The label on the original instrument reads “In Padua Vvendelio Venere de Leonardo Tieffenbrucker 1582”.

View full instrument details >