Nine course Renaissance lutes

Printed music which requires a lute with nine courses first appears in Anthoine Francique’s Le trésor d’Orphée of 1600. Use of the instrument in England is marked by Thomas Robinson School of Musicke (1603) and John Dowland’s Lachrimae (1604).

Magno Tieffenbrucker

Magno Tieffenbrucker

  • 64.5 cm
  • 9 ½ frets
  • Model MM

Based on an instrument by Magno Tieffenbrucker in the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna (C.45)

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Sixtus Rauwolf

Sixtus Rauwolf

  • String length 64
  • 9 ⅔ fret spaces
  • Model R

Based on original instrument by Sixtus Rauwolf in Augsburg, now owned and played by Jakob Lindberg

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