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9 and 10 Course Lutes

Printed music for a nine course lute first appears in Anthoine Francique’s Le Trésor d’Orphée of 1600. Use of the instrument in England is marked by Thomas Robinson School of Musicke (1603) and John Dowland’s Lachrimae (1604). Ten course lutes first appear around 1610. A rich repertoire for the instrument exists in print and manuscript sources, using both the old renaissance tuning and some of the new tunings which started to appear in the the course of the early 17th century.

9c Lutes

  • 64 cm Based on the Sixtus Rauwolf lute owned by Jakob Lindberg. 15 ribs
  • 65 cm Magno Tieffenbrucker, C.45 (Vienna), full size. 21 or 31ribs

10c Lutes

  • 65.5 cm Magno Tieffenbrucker, C.45 (Vienna) 21 or 31 ribs
  • 66.0 cm Hans Frei, C.34 (Vienna).11 ribs
  • 67.2 cm Based on the Sixtus Rauwolf lute owned by Jakob Lindberg. 15 ribs

In the above list the measurement shows the string length from nut to bridge. Specific associations of string length and pitch are avoided, but the following are approximate guides for instruments of 6-10 courses.

60 cm – “g” tuning
64 cm – “f#” tuning
67 cm – “f” tuning
70 cm – “e” tuning

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